You will have perceived by now that I was not one to profit by the experience of others, that it was a very long time indeed before I stopped believing in new faces and began to understand the lesson in that story, which was that it is distinctly possible to stay too long at the Fair. I could not tell you when I began to understand that. All I know is that it was very bad when I was twenty-eight. Everything that was said to me I seemed to have heard before, and I could no longer listen. I could no longer sit in little bars near Grand Central and listen to someone complaining of his wife’s inability to cope with the help while he missed another train to Connecticut. I no longer had any interest in hearing about the advances other people had received from their publishers, about plays which were having second-act trouble in Philadelphia, or about people I would like very much if only I would come out and meet them. I had already met them, always.

Joan Didion

Email is an old-new medium. It hasn’t been around for very long, but its death has been predicted a million times by now. What was supposed to kill it made it stronger — quick conversations have moved to chat services, links are on Twitter, and your aunt is now sharing her vacation photo albums on Facebook. That leaves more space in our inboxes for something meaningful.

Hello Friend turned six today. Tumblr told me about this via email, and I felt a lot of things I would never have expected to feel upon hearing that my personal blog was six years old. Preparing to move cross-country and leave Chicago — where I moved at about the same time I started using Tumblr — has a lot to do with this, I’m sure, but still: Six years, man. How is that even possible?

Hello Friend turned six today. Tumblr told me about this via email, and I felt a lot of things I would never have expected to feel upon hearing that my personal blog was six years old. Preparing to move cross-country and leave Chicago — where I moved at about the same time I started using Tumblr — has a lot to do with this, I’m sure, but still: Six years, man. How is that even possible?

(Source: assets)

I had never been to Abbey Road before then, and I haven’t been back since. On one hand, it’s just a studio. But then I’m moving the U47 [microphone] around and I’m like, “Wow, it’s got those pop filters just like in the Beatles book… oh, wait.” All the same shit is in there. The whole week we were there there was this upright piano that sounded so familiar when you played it. I bugged the assistant and he would never tell me anything, but finally he relented and was like, “Uh, ‘Penny Lane.’”

As a member of the avant-garde who is capable of perceiving the conspiracy before it is fully obvious to an as yet unaroused public, the paranoid is a militant leader. He does not see social conflict as something to be mediated and compromised, in the manner of the working politician. Since what is at stake is always a conflict between absolute good and absolute evil, what is necessary is not compromise but the will to fight things out to a finish. Since the enemy is thought of as being totally evil and totally unappeasable, he must be totally eliminated—if not from the world, at least from the theatre of operations to which the paranoid directs his attention. This demand for total triumph leads to the formulation of hopelessly unrealistic goals, and since these goals are not even remotely attainable, failure constantly heightens the paranoid’s sense of frustration. Even partial success leaves him with the same feeling of powerlessness with which he began, and this in turn only strengthens his awareness of the vast and terrifying quality of the enemy he opposes.

Forty years on, Hofstadter keeps being right. Probably because he was Illuminati! Ahhh!

We want to invest in the places where we are accepted better,” said Islom Shakhbandarov, a Turkish immigrant leader. “And we are accepted better in Dayton.

Dealing with terrorists has taught us some things,” said Washington Rep. Jim McDermott after voting no on one of Thursday’s GOP bills. “You can’t deal with ’em. This mess was created by the Republicans for one purpose, and they lost. People in my district are calling in for Obamacare—affordable health care—in large numbers. These guys have lost, and they can’t figure out how to admit it.” Why would House Democrats give away what the Supreme Court and the 2012 electorate didn’t? “You can’t say, OK, you get half of Obamacare—this isn’t a Solomonic decision,” McDermott said. “So we sit here until they figure out they fuckin’ lost.

(Source: leo-dicaps, via merlin)

Five years ago it was O’Brien’s Andy Kaufman-esque solo show (“Shatter” at Second City’s e.t.c) that got him noticed and cast shortly thereafter in Second City’s mainstage in “America All Better,” which ran from 2008-2009. Both the Second City revue and his solo turn showcased his tendency to upend audience expectations, often playing terribly polite characters who were also vaguely hostile. That kind of approach can be incredibly subversive in the right hands, in the right show. He has sharp observational skills offset by an almost innocent persona. It will be fascinating to see how this quality is put to use in front of the camera.

From a Saturday Night Live personnel update. I have to admit, after six years in Chicago, the whole being-able-to-see-surefire-future-SNL-cast-members-for-$30-pretty-much-whenever-you-want thing is still sincerely cool.

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